IT4YOUTH

2012 FALL PROGRAM

 

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STUDENTS: 6th - 12th graders

Students need to bring their own lap-tops.


2012 FALL PROGRAM:

  • Youth Programmers:

      • Java Programming Beginner        (Registration OPEN)                  

  • Youth Game Masters:

      • 3D Game Design Beginner          (Registration OPEN)      

      • 3D Game Design Advanced         (Registration OPEN)    

  • Youth Web Developer:

      • Web Design Beginner                 (Registration OPEN)   

      • Web Design Advanced                (Registration OPEN)  

 

AP CLASSES:

  •  AP Computer Science                      (Registration OPEN)  

COURSE OUTLINES:

  • Youth Programmers - Java Programming Beginner

Lesson 1: Introduction to Java Programming
Lesson 2: Create a Java application
Lesson 3: Java basic data/operation and Lesson
Lesson 4: JFC, Swing
Lesson 5: Project 1 – Desktop Application
Lesson 6: Web development JSP
Lesson 7: Project 2 – Web Application
Lesson 8: Android programming
Lesson 9: Project 3 – Android Apps
Lesson 10: Embedded Java Programming
Lesson 11: Team Programming
Lesson 12: Team Project
Lesson 13: Wrap up
 
  • Youth Game Masters -  3D Game Desgin Beginner

Upon completion of the course, students will have mastered the advanced topics of Character Controllers, Projectors, Audio Listeners, Audio Sources & Audio Clips, Multiple Cameras (and how to switch between them), UnityGUI scripting system, Colliders, Messages & events,  Particle systems, Blob shadows, Scripting (AI, state machines, player controls).

  • Prerequisite:

Students should have mastered the basics of using a modern PC or Mac.  The student should have mastered the 3D Game Design Beginner course prior to taking this course.

  • Objectives

Upon completion of the course, students will have mastered the advanced topics of Character Controllers, Projectors, Audio Listeners, Audio Sources & Audio Clips, Multiple Cameras (and how to switch between them), UnityGUI scripting system, Colliders, Messages & events,  Particle systems, Blob shadows, Scripting (AI, state machines, player controls).

  • TOPICS: 
  • Character Animation.
  • Creating a Plot.
  • Blending the Unity 3D objects into a coherent story.
  • Setting up your scenes.
  • Creating a good User Interface to play the game.
  • Creating Adversaries.
  • Adding audio and other Unity 3D features to give your fame that polished feeling.
  • Optimizing the performance of  your game.
  • Mastering the creating of different levels.

For this class we will be creating a game and a character called Lerpz.  This project will be used to demonstrate and enforce all of the topics that will be taught in this class.   Each student will create a final project based on the Lerpz project that expresses their own design and creativity.

 
  • Youth Game Masters -  3D Game Desgin Advanced

Upon completion of the course, students will have mastered the advanced topics of Character Controllers, Projectors, Audio Listeners, Audio Sources & Audio Clips, Multiple Cameras (and how to switch between them), UnityGUI scripting system, Colliders, Messages & events,  Particle systems, Blob shadows, Scripting (AI, state machines, player controls).

  • Prerequisite:

Students should have mastered the basics of using a modern PC or Mac.  The student should have mastered the 3D Game Design Beginner course prior to taking this course.

  • Objectives

Upon completion of the course, students will have mastered the advanced topics of Character Controllers, Projectors, Audio Listeners, Audio Sources & Audio Clips, Multiple Cameras (and how to switch between them), UnityGUI scripting system, Colliders, Messages & events,  Particle systems, Blob shadows, Scripting (AI, state machines, player controls).

  • TOPICS:
  • Character Animation.
  • Creating a Plot.
  • Blending the Unity 3D objects into a coherent story.
  • Setting up your scenes.
  • Creating a good User Interface to play the game.
  • Creating Adversaries.
  • Adding audio and other Unity 3D features to give your fame that polished feeling.
  • Optimizing the performance of  your game.
  • Mastering the creating of different levels.

For this class we will be creating a game and a character called Lerpz.  This project will be used to demonstrate and enforce all of the topics that will be taught in this class.   Each student will create a final project based on the Lerpz project that expresses their own design and creativity.

 

  • Youth Web Developers -  Web Design Beginner

Lesson 1: Introduction to the Internet
Lesson 2: Creating a Basic Web Page
Lesson 3: Attributes, Lists and Tables
Lesson 4: Links and Images
Lesson 5: Cascading Style Sheets Introduction
Lesson 6: CSS - Selector Type, Values, Common Properties
Lesson 7: CSS - Common Properties (Cont'd), Directory Structure, Some Common Tags
Lesson 8: Web Page Layout Techniques
Lesson 9: Introduction to WYSIWYG webdesign software
Lesson 10: More Features of WYSIWYG webdesign software
Lesson 11: Individual and Team project
Lesson 12:  Individual and Team project 2
Lesson 13:  Wrap up
 
  • Youth Web Developer -  Web Design Advanced

Lesson 1: CSS Tips & Tricks (1)
Lesson 2: CSS Tips & Tricks (2)
Lesson 3: JavaScript Introduction
Lesson 4: Variable, If-Else, Switch
Lesson 5: Operators, Popups, Functions, Loops
Lesson 6: Forms, Events, and Event Handling
Lesson 7: Try-Catch, Some Guidelines of JavaScript Programming
Lesson 8: Introduction to JavaScript Object
Lesson 9: JS Built-in Objects (1)
Lesson 10: JS Built-in Objects (2)
Lesson 11: Individual and Team project
Lesson 12:  Individual and Team project 2
Lesson 13:  Wrap up
 
  •  AP Computer Science

 

The AP Computer Science course is an introductory course in computer science. Because the design and implementation of computer programs to solve problems involve skills that are fundamental to the study of computer science, a large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods. In addition, the responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course

Prerequisites

The necessary prerequisites for entering the AP Computer Science course include knowledge of basic algebra and experience in problem solving.  A student in the AP Computer Science course should be comfortable with functions and the concepts found in the uses of functional notation, such as f(x) 5 x 1 2 and f(x) 5 g(h(x)). It is important that students and their advisers understand that any significant computer science course builds upon a foundation of mathematical reasoning that should be acquired before attempting such a course. One prerequisite for the AP Computer Science course, competence in written communication, deserves special attention. Documentation plays a central role in the programming methodology that forms the heart of the AP Computer Science course. Students should have already acquired facility in written communication before entering the course.

Goals

The goals of the AP Computer Science A course are comparable to those in the introductory course for computer science majors offered in college and university computer science departments. It is not expected, however, that all students in the AP Computer Science A course will major in computer science at the university level. The AP Computer Science A course is intended to serve both as an introductory course for computer science majors and as a course for people who will major in other disciplines that require significant involvement with technology. It is not a substitute for the usual college-preparatory mathematics courses. The following goals apply to the AP Computer Science A course when interpreted within the context of the course. Students should be able to:

  • design and implement solutions to problems by writing, running, and debugging computer programs.
  • use and implement commonly used algorithms and data structures.
  • develop and select appropriate algorithms and data structures to solve problems.
  • code fluently in an object-oriented paradigm using the programming language Java. Students are expected to be familiar with and be able to use standard Java library classes from the AP Java subset.
  • read and understand a large program consisting of several classes and interacting objects. Students should be able to read and understand a description of the design and development process leading to such a program. (An example of such a program is the AP Computer Science Case Study.)
  • recognize the ethical and social implications of computer use.

Course Materials Required

Students should have access to a computer system that represents relatively recent technology. The system must be able to compile in seconds programs comparable in size to the current AP ComputerScience Case Study, and response time should be reasonably rapid. This will require large hard disk drives either on individual machines or shared via a network.  Each student in the course should have a minimum of three hours per week alone on a computer throughout the academic year; additional time is desirable. This access can be made available at any time during the school day or after school and need not be made available to all students in the AP course simultaneously. It should be stressed that (1) this requirement represents a bare minimum of access; and (2) this time is not instructional time at a computer with the teacher or a tutor but is time that the student spends alone at a computer in addition to the instructional time. Schools that do not allow their facilities to be used after school hours may wish to reevaluate such a policy in light of the needs of their students who take the AP Computer Science course. Schools offering AP Computer Science will need to have Java software and enough memory in their lab machines so that students will be able to compile and run Java programs efficiently. Both free and commercial Java systems are available from a variety of sources. At a minimum, the hardware configuration will need large hard drives and sufficient memory to support current operating systems and compilers.                               

Topic Outline

Following is an outline of the major topics considered for the AP Computer Science Exam. This outline is intended to define the scope of the course.

  • Object-Oriented Program Design
  • Program Implementation
  • Program Analysis
  • Standard Data Structures
  • Standard Algorithms
  • Computing in Context